Tag: interview help

interview leave-behind

You probably go into an interview with very little in your hands. Your phone is in the car, keys in your pocket, and your resume is tucked inside a notebook you will use to take notes during the interview. What if I told you that you’ve forgotten something? Not sure what it is? Let me help you. You need a leave-behind.

What is a leave-behind? I can hear your panicked voice already. You’ve been preparing for this interview, and you want it to be as successful as possible. That’s why you want to put together a folder with content that you plan to leave with the interviewer at the end of the interview.

You more than likely submitted samples of your work when you applied, but the interviewers may not have seen them or might not remember what was your work. For that reason, you want to pick some of your best samples. Showcase your writing skills or graphic design experience. If you’ve managed social media, bring some analytics that highlights your talent to reach an audience. All of these should be found in your online portfolio, but it is much more convenient for the interviewer if you have physical copies to show them and discuss during the interview.

Here are some key things you should include in your leave-behind.

  1. Folder – Don’t ever leave a stack of loose papers. Head over to Walmart and get yourself a cheap folder with prongs and a pack of plastic paper cover dividers. You won’t impress them by buying the most expensive folder and professionally laminating each paper. Something cheap will do.
  2. Resume – ALWAYS have a copy of your resume. ALWAYS. When you go into the interview, they will likely have a copy of your resume already. Bring several copies anyways. Some interviews are conducted with panels, and nothing is more inconveniencing than having several people lean over one sheet of paper. Print several copies, and put them in the front pouch of the folder.
  3. References – As you know, your references should not be on your resume, so print out your references and put them as the first page in your leave-behind.
  4. Writing samples – If you have a lot of experience writing, or the position you’re applying for requires a skilled writer, you NEED to provide proof of your writing skills. Pick 2-3 of your best writing samples, and include them in your leave-behind.
  5. Graphic Design – Graphic design is a sought after skill these days. Many positions require applicants to have some knowledge of graphic design programs like Photoshop and InDesign. Show the interviewer that you have the skills they’re looking for by including 3-4 samples of graphic design work that you have done.
  6. Analytics – Creating compelling social media posts is impressive, but to impress, even more, provide analytics of social media accounts you’ve managed. Include the following and engagement when you started compared to when you left.

What NOT to include in your leave-behind

  1. Your selfie – You may think that having your picture in your leave-behind will help the recruiters remember you, but it can cause more harm than good. Including your image can open up the door for the interviewers to make a decision based on bias. You want them to call you back because of your qualifications, not your face, so focus on your skills and experience instead of your appearance.
  2. Your address – No interviewer on the earth needs to know your full home address. While it’s fine to provide the area that you live in to assure the interviewer that you can make the commute to the office, they don’t need to know exactly where you rest your head at night.
  3. Bad samples – Your goal is to impress the interviewer. Providing samples with grammatical errors or poor design will only guarantee that you don’t get a callback.
  4. Plagiarized work – While it may impress them in the interview, the truth will come out, and let me just tell you – recruiters talk with other recruiters.
  5. Group work without attribution – This falls under plagiarism, technically, but it needs to be stated separately. If you were not the sole author or creator of a piece of work, you need to attribute it to all contributors to the project. It is okay to provide group work in your leave-behind, but make sure you highlight the portions that you worked on the most.

Do you include something in your leave-behind that didn’t make our list? Put it in the comments below!

resume writing

Your resume is the first impression a potential employer has of you and making one of the resume mistakes we talk about can be an instant disqualifier. Some employers admit to discarding a resume if they find even one grammatical or spelling error. A recruiter starts with a massive stack of applicants and resumes to go through which means their starting focus is on rejecting applicants. To make their job easier, the recruiter will look for the smallest mistake or reason to disqualify you. Help your chances and avoid these common resume mistakes.

Spelling and Grammar

The number one disqualifier for any resume is the presence of spelling or grammatical errors. A resume with incorrect spelling or grammar tells a recruiter that you lack attention to detail and the ability to proof-read. These are key skills for any employer, which is why if an applicant shows they don’t possess them, it is an instant ‘no’ for the recruiter.

  1. Personal Pronouns – One very common mistake seen on resumes is the use of personal pronouns. Your resume should never include the words “I,” “you,” “she,” or “he.”
  2. Incorrect Tense – This should go without saying, but when you describe a past position, make sure you use past tense. As well, when you describe a current position, be sure to use the present tense. Recruiters pay attention to details like that, and incorrect use of tenses can put you in the fast lane to rejection.

Format

The layout and format of your resume need to be clear, clean, and concise. The recruiter needs to be able to quickly skim over your resume and identify your strengths, experience, and the type of position you would be a good fit for. There are several mistakes you can make when formatting your resume.

1. Too much text

I get it, your resume is the only tool you have to impress the recruiter and land the first interview, so you want to put as much information about yourself as possible to paint the biggest picture for the recruiter. However, putting too much text on your resume can result in the opposite. By decreasing the margins and text size and crunching as many words as you can onto the page, you might overwhelm the recruiter and land your resume instantly in the ‘no’ pile. The recruiter is only going to spend about 30 seconds looking at your resume. They want to be able to glance through it and be able to identify the key points.

2. Too many bullets

On the other side of the spectrum, you can use too few sentences and too many bullets. An overuse of bullets causes the recruiter’s eyes to glaze over the same as long paragraphs of text. Bullets are meant to be used for important information, so if everything is bulleted, then everything is important, and if everything is important, then nothing really stands out. Use bullets to highlight your responsibilities at previous positions and important skills you want the recruiter to notice.

3. No keywords

Every job posting will have keywords about the job requirements and skills the applicant needs to have. Recruiters are looking for those specific words when they are scanning your resume. If they don’t see any correlation or overlap between your resume and their job description, they are moving on. People tend to think they can send the same resume on every application, but that is a huge misconception. You should rewrite your resume for every job you apply for. Reword your experience and skills to include keywords from the job description. Recruiters want to know that you have the specific experience and skills they are looking for and doing this will make sure you stand out.

4. Hard to read font

This is one of the easiest resume mistakes to fix. Stay away from cursive and italic fonts. Choose something simple and easy to read, not just printed by digitally. Many resumes are reviewed online now, and some fonts are more difficult to read online than they are when they are printed. Test out different fonts to find one that you like but also works printed and digitally.

Professionalism

Your resume should show that you are a qualified professional and you take your career seriously. There are two ways that you can unintentionally tell the recruiter something different.

  1. Unprofessional email address – The email address you provide on your resume is a large indicator of your professionalism. We all have our first email address, but that doesn’t have to be the one on your resume. If your email is LadyKiller@hotmail.com or iheartjustinbieber77@gmail.com, then it is time for an update. I recommend having an email address that is your name. You can add numbers if just your name is not available, but make sure they are not inappropriate. The good news is, making a new email is completely free.
  2. Irrelevant social media URLs – In some positions, it would be beneficial to include links to your social media profiles. However, your social media is not relevant to all positions. Unless you are applying to a position where you will be required to write, manage social media, or be in the public’s eye as a representative of the company, there is little need for a link to your Facebook page. If your accounts are full of inappropriate or offensive content, it will do more harm to include your URLs.

If you want more resume help, we hosted a Facebook Live Resume Workshop. Watch the video here.